Writing Expectations

  • ***ALWAYS READ YOUR WORK BEFORE TURNING IT IN.

    • Head paper as shown on the back.
    • No white out;  ONE LINE THROUGH MISTAKES.
    • More than three cross-outs on a paper to be turned in? Recopy!
    • CURSIVE, unless otherwise instructed for all final drafts, and work turned in.
    • Dark blue or black ink, not markers.
    • Pencil may be used for drawing, brainstorming, prewriting, rough drafts.
    • Do not circle, underline or quote things for no reason.
    • Do not write THE END.
    • When using dialogue, start a new paragraph when another person (character) speaks.
    • Check the rules for dialogue in your grammar book if you are uncertain.
    • Paragraph length:  Sixth Grade=6-8 sentences, Seventh Grade=7-9 sentences,
    • Eighth Grade=8-10 sentences.  Assignments will vary in length (number of paragraphs).

     

    USING THE COMPUTER:

    ***MAKE SURE YOUR COMPUTER AND PRINTER ARE BOTH WORKING. ASSIGNMENTS MUST BE TURNED IN ON TIME.

    • Do not use all capitals.
    • Tab once for paragraphs.
    • Use textbook fonts:  HELVETICA, PALATINO, GENEVA.
    • Font size 12 for text;  titles may be larger.
    • Double space.
    • One space after a comma.
    • Two spaces after a period (.), semicolon (;) and colon (:).


    WRITING PROCESS:

    BRAINSTORM:  Use pencil. May print, and should be up to one page. Include story ideas, catch words and phrases, who, what, when where, why, how.
    PRE-WRITE:  Use pencil. May print.  Should include the main ideas of the story, which will later be beefed up with details and vocabulary.  Must be read and signed by a reader.
    ROUGH DRAFT:  May use pencil. May print, and MUST SKIP LINES. This is the story with all the ideas and vocabulary. It must be neatly written.
    EDITING:  You and another person MUST edit your work for continuity, spelling, grammar, punctuation, proper paragraphs, overall details, and handwriting. It must be signed by the editor.
    FINAL DRAFT:  Includes all corrections and is in the correct format.
    PUBLISHING:  Share with the audience. This includes the teacher.

     

    GUIDE FOR PROOFREADING

    1. Is the first word of every paragraph indented?
    2. Do all verbs agree with each subject?
    3. Does every sentence and every proper noun begin with a capital letter?
    4. Does every sentence have the proper punctuation?
    5. Are all the words spelled correctly?
    6. Have you used your very best handwriting/computer skills?

    C.O.P.S.: Capitals-Organization-Punctuation-Spelling

    GUIDE FOR REVISING

    1. Are the characters and setting fully described?
    2. Have you chosen verbs that make the action exciting?
    3. Does your story have a beginning, middle, and end?
    4. Have you told the story in sequence?
    5. Have you added time words to make the time action clear?
    6. Have you beefed up your story with strong vocabulary?

     

    Correction Marks

    = New Paragraph

    = Not A Word

    = Dead Word

    = Not A Sentence

    = One Word

    = Not Correct

    = An area that does not make sense, or needs to be moved

    = Insert the above parts

    = Omit (line through work)

    = Split the word (not a compound)

    = Unclear

    = Space once or twice

    = Misspelling

    =Capitalize

    =Lower Case

    WRITING HINTS:

    Do not begin a sentence with:  And, Because, “Cuz, “Cause, And then, Then, So, But

    Do not begin every sentence with I.

    Do not use:  The End, That’s It, By  (Your Name).

    Do not use arrows or the word OVER to indicate turning the page over.

    Restrict the use of:  always, just, very, and, so, them, all, all of, had, great, but, really

    About to=poor grammar.

    Use word for numbers.  Never start a sentence like: 10 people left Pinole.

     

    Dates may be written with numbers.

    July 30, 1976 is correct.

    July 30th, 1976 is incorrect.

    October 21 is correct.

    October 21st is incorrect.